Glasgow Airport staff trained to assist passengers with autism

In a recent article by Airport Parking Shop, the light was shed on how travelling with autism can, at some points, be a stressful experience.

It was thought that UK airports could actively do more to take this stress off of passengers, with staff training and fast track security being two of the strongest suggestions. With this in mind, this week’s news that Glasgow Airport has become the first airport in the UK to provide specialist staff training, in order to aid and assist the Autism Reality Experience is brilliant to hear!

Continue reading…


Record month for Glasgow Airport!

Official numbers have been revealed, Glasgow Airport boasts passenger numbers around 603,000 which is a 7.7% increase from February in 2016. The airport have also said they have seen a 20.3% rise in flights to European destinations such as Barcelona, Brussels and Paris.

Data chart from Glasgow Airport
Continue reading…


New member of Glasgow Airport staff – Britain’s first robot worker

December; the month of new gadget gifts! Well last month, Glasgow Airport unveiled a little gadget of their own. The airport presented its newest worker amongst the crew; GLAdys, a 4-foot tall, state of the art robot, fit with 3 main entertainment functions, built to communicate with passengers in the main terminals over the month of December. Continue reading…


John Barrie – The Glasgow Airport life saver is set to retire a hero

After 11 years of loyal duty, the duty safety officer at Glasgow Airport has decided he is ready to retire.

John Barrie, who has more than a decade of saving lives at the busy Scottish airport under his belt, has given CPR more than 12 times while watching travellers pass through the city and even keeps in touch with those who his first class medical assistance has saved. Not all heros wear capes! Continue reading…


New train station in Glasgow could provide quick transport to the Airport

Plans have been revealed to build a new train station on a 40 acre site near to Glasgow Airport.

The new train facilities would be situated just over a mile from the airport itself and would be used to transport passengers to the terminal on a specialist track using lightweight vehicles. The train station would also feature a park and ride car park for passenger use.

Train passing through Glasgow City Centre
Continue reading…


Glasgow Airport celebrates it’s 50th Birthday!

It was congratulations all round for Glasgow Airport on Monday (02/05/16) as they celebrated 50 years since the day they opened. With new routes to Jamaica and Cape Verde recently announced, the airport’s success is definitely something to shout about.

As a way of marking the Milestone Birthday, the airport decided to recreate the first time a plane ever landed at the airport. The plane was a six seater Piper Cherokee and the man in charge was Capt. Kenneth Foster. This venture into the airport actually took place on 1st May 1966, the day before the airport officially opened because Capt. Foster wanted to check everything was in order for the first commercial flights the following day. He wrote: “We found a few of the approach lights were not accurately aligned and required adjustment by the contractors…”. With the issues fixed, “a ministry car drove along the runway to check that any incoming flights could land on “the pristine runway”.

With Glasgow Airport receiving continuing support from Loganair, Icelandair and Aer Lingus, among many others, the airport has seen “significant progress over the years”, the former Loganair chairman, Scott Grier, told BBC News.

The Chief Executive of Glasgow Airport, Amanda McMillan, said: “It started with just three airlines, and now we have over 30, flying to over 110 destinations”, to which she also added that they “support more than 7,000 jobs” meaning it has a huge impact on Scotland as a whole. We are so excited to see what Glasgow Airport can achieve in the next 50 years.

If you would like to tell us your about experience at Glasgow Airport, leave us a comment!


Glasgow is set to have a record year and beat 2006!

Glasgow Airport have recently been celebrating their largest percentage increase in annual passenger numbers. Good news is that the numbers are expecting to increase and top previous records set in 2006 to become the busiest record on year for Glasgow Airport.

Currently celebrating it’s 50th birthday, Glasgow Airport has revealed that the total number of passengers reached 8.71 million in 2015 which was a 13% increase on the previous year and forecasts that 2016 will be its busiest year. Amanda McMillan, the Managing Director of Glasgow Airport claims that to fulfill these targets, they would need anything more than 8.83 million passengers, a record set back in 2006 before the large recession and financial crisis.

The good news doesn’t stop there! The airport also recorded a 16.8% increase on the previous year for international passengers travelling out of Glasgow which hit 4.61 million in 2015. Glasgow Airport attributed a lot of their success over the last 12 months to 30 new routes and services, better connections to major cities, and strengthening its position as a long-haul provider. Other great achievements in 2015 included; domestic passenger numbers totalling 4.1 million (9% increase on 2014) and passenger numbers in December reaching 569,411 (10.1% increase on December 2014.)

Amanda McMillan went on to emphase that “2016 marks the airport’s 50th anniversary and we are determined to ensure this year makes the history books” and that…. “We remain focused on delivering more success in the year ahead.”

For more information regarding Glasgow and other UK airports check out @Airport_Guides for all of our updates!


Glasgow best for short security queues

Standing in long queues at security is a major bugbear for any airport user, particularly for families travelling in the school holidays. Perhaps we should all move north of the border because Glasgow Airport has recently been revealed as the gold standard when it comes to clearing security quickly.

A survey was carried out on seven major UK airports by the Civil Aviation Authority, during which time 27,000 passengers had their say. The airports surveyed were London’s Heathrow, Gatwick, Luton and Stansted, Scotland’s Edinburgh and Glasgow, plus Manchester.

The average wait to pass through security screening at Glasgow was a mere 3.3 minutes, as compared with 6 minutes at fellow Scottish airport Edinburgh, and 9 minutes at Stansted.

99.6% of Glasgow passengers waited less than 10 minutes and 97.3% less than 5 minutes. At Stansted only 80% of passengers clear security in under 10 minutes.

The length of time that screening takes depends on the number of passengers having to remove items such as jackets and belts, as well of course as the number of items of luggage needing to be screened, to say nothing of the number of travellers who, years on, still seem to be confused about the restriction on taking liquids through security!

Glasgow Airport has invested millions of pounds on security after an attempted terrorist attack in 2007 when a jeep, packed with explosives, was driven at the terminal building. A new hub was opened a year later and in 2012 Glasgow was the first airport in the country to introduce a state-of-the-art scanning system for boarding passes.

The good news for Glasgow comes a month after it recorded its busiest July for 6 years, due in part to the Commonwealth Games.

The airport hit the news again this week with the announcement of four new routes to Prague, Antalya in Turkey, Malta and Larnaca in Cyprus.


The BAA urges tax rethink

The BAA, owner of Glasgow, Edinburgh, and Aberdeen airports, has called for Westminster to surrender aviation tax control to Holyrood, the seat of the Scottish Government. The move, which has also drawn the support of Infratil, the company behind Prestwick Airport, would allow MPs to control the value of Air Passenger Duty (APD) in Scotland.

APD costs Scotland £77m in lost tourism every year, according to the BAA. The much-maligned tax has been criticised by Sir Richard Branson, Ryanair chief, Michael O’Leary, travel organisation ABTA, and “more than half” of all long-haul travellers, who say that APD will eventually make regular flights unfeasible. Adding to APD’s list of detractors are Thomson, Jet2, and UK flag-carrying airline, British Airways.

Jet2 boss, Philip Meeson, claims that the government is "hell bent" on ruining the summer holiday season for British travellers.

Critics believe that the Coalition doesn’t fully appreciate the impact of APD on the tourism industry or that the lucrative levy is blinding cash-strapped MPs to the consequences of heavy taxation. The latter point is perhaps best demonstrated via an article in the Independent, which notes that MPs have recently consulted on a further rise to APD. Scotland’s annual loses could potentially hit (and surpass) the £110m mark, if the motion is passed.

Edinburgh Airport chief, Kevin Brown, said that Scotland is not looking for an ‘easy ride’, regarding aviation taxes. “We are not saying we should not be taxed, only that any taxation is fair and proportionate." Mr. Brown’s counterpart at Glasgow Airport, Amanda McMillan, was concerned that APD could force airlines to spurn Scottish airports, in favour of hubs that are not subjected to the “continued rise in APD”, such as those in Holland and Belgium.

Scotland’s location in Europe means that air travel is particularly important in forging links with major economic centres on the continent, such as Brussels and Frankfurt. However, the country is presently losing millions of passengers to APD, alleged to be one of the highest transport taxes on the planet.

APD generates £2bn a year for Westminster. The figure could increase by 50% (to £3bn) over the next few years, if Virgin Atlantic chief, Sir Richard Branson is to be believed.